vector portrait

Posted: December 15, 2010 in Uncategorized

well.. my brain hurts now

Advertisements

Yesterday at school (Dec 7th), the Cal State San Marcos VPA Department hosted another live event. This time it took place at the Black Box Theatre Performance. It was a dance performance, but the interesting thing was that it was an improv performance. Unfortunately, the event started at 7:00 pm and I had one of my classes run a little long so I missed some of the beginning. The night contained a bunch of improv dances, but also showcased many videos about dance.

A pleasant surprise was discovering that Aaron Sison from my graphic design class was one of the participants of the night. He did a lot of funny improv dances referencing michael jackson and other genres of dance. However, more specifically, he did a collaborative video with Lance McCormick. It was about a guy mentally preparing before he goes out an plays basketball.

This video was prominent for a number of reasons. First of all, I think that their concept helped me understand that many pieces can be successful by mixing different types of art. Lance and Aaron mixed music and video, with dance and the beautiful flow of motion during the game of basketball.

Still, it made me look at how we interact with music/dance in our world. Their video made me realize how prominent music has become in our culture and how dominant it is subconsciously. The subject in their video is playing music in his head as he prepares before he plays. I found it funny because I find myself doing that whenever I need motivation to do something. I will play a song in my head to get focused. I feel that I have a new realization to how much music effects people emotionally. Like when I go to the gym I will play aggressive music, or when I’m doing homework I will play something more relaxing and inspirational.

From the event I learned that dance is looked differently through each culture. Its funny how we have a classification to what  “good” dancing. The most important thing about dancing, I think, is that people are expressing themselves and their emotions kinetically.

I felt a lot of respect for the people that were on stage that night. I know when I was younger I was really embarrassed when it came to dancing in front of a crowd. These people overcame that struggle and gave me a chance to watch. The only issue I had was justifying mood, because at some points i felt like laughing, and then other parts were serious. So maybe just a way to separate the polars a little more.

 

 

text heavy poster

Posted: December 9, 2010 in Uncategorized

This semester Deborah Small teaches a Photo Documentary Class. One of the assignments for the students was to create a series of triptics from the subject matter of their semester project. I got to talk first hand with artists when I sat in on her monday night class on  Monday, December 29, 2010 when the pieces were being displayed.

I learned that this school has a lot of talented artists. My favorite piece was the work by Elaine Jamir, particularly because she did a great job of developing a leading line with her polytiptic.  The fence in the background follows through all four of the photographs, but what’s even more fascinating is that she did it in a diagonal line, which makes it much more dynamic and have a vast amount of visual weight.

I was inspired by her and tried to follow something similar in my piece, but did it with the placement of the subjects in the photo. I also followed a technique of repetition in another one and repeated the strong lines in the photos.

Lucia Asbury’s piece made think differently about the aesthetics of beauty. Her triptics showed a transormation of a girl before and after make-up. It makes you think about what beauty really stands for now. It made me feel like people have become so superficial now. I had a lot of respect for her because she used herself as her subject and put herself out there for everyone to see; especially her peers. That took a lot of courage.

I think maybe a flaw in the even was that some of the students weren’t proud of their work and took down the photos after class. It left certain parts of the wall in the room bare and looked awkward Another thing is that they were put up with thumb-tacs. If there was more time, or if it was more cost effective, I think a lot of them would look really nice if they were in some sort of picture frame.

From the triptics I learned that people can easily tell a story, even when dwindled down to only three images. Another thing I learned, is that not matter how random the images can be, when place adjacent next to each other, they develop some sort of relationship, and viewers will find a way to discover similarities.

 

On November 23, 2010 I went to a theatre in La Jolla that played special limited release screenings of films. This one in particular was 127 hours, directed by Danny Boyle. The independent film, starring James Franco, is a true story about a man who is trapped under a boulder and has to come to terms with his own life. When I watched the trailer for 127 Hours, I expected it to be similar, if not identical to the movie Cast Away, with Tom Hanks.

However, once I got to see the movie, I understood it was much more complex, deeper, and symbolic. The trailer portrayed a male trapped and secluded with no means of communicating for help, but it was more that that.

The director, Danny Boyle, did a great job of transforming what used to be a rock, into a precious diamond. From the movie, I concluded that it was about past, present, and future. Boyle showed me that all three of these segments in out lives our somehow intertwined and reflect on one another. Sometimes it takes something as little as losing a limb to make one recognize what is important in life. Thanks to Boyle I was able to tap into the psyche of Aaron Ralston and see that his story was more than just a guy trapped under a rock, and for that I show great respect for him.

I continued to learn a lot about the cinematic discipline, such as shot composure, story structure, and most importantly, theme. It’s not the story thats important, but it’s how you tell it that makes people think.

With this event, I think one thing that could have made it better is if it was a wider release film. That way the theatre I watch it in has a better sound system and stadium seating to make the most of my experience.

 

 

Art Event #5- Ordover Gallery

Posted: December 6, 2010 in Uncategorized

This weekend, between the chaos of wrapping up things for this fall semester, I was able to see the wonderful array of images at the Ordover Gallery. The art exhibition that was displayed this season was the “Storms” series by photographer, Mitch Dobrowner.

Dobrowner does a great job of capturing the sheer beauty that is held by mother-nature. From the event, I got the literal term that “a picture is worth a thousand words.” For my own work, Dobrowner can influence me to change my subject matter. I like taking portraits and photos of people or other things such as cars. Dobrowner’s photographs inspire me to explore a little more with landscape photography.

Not only has it influenced my work habits, it has helped me broaden my horizon to what I have still not discovered even after my 22 years on this planet. After living in a big city for most of my life, I rarely get to see the magnificent splendor that this world has to offer.  The landscape photographs by Mitch Dobrowner makes me look at our society’s lifestyle in a different life, and makes me solidify my thoughts about traveling after I graduate to experience life outside San Diego.

Although I appreciated the opportunity to view Dobrowner’s photographic series, there were a couple things that I saw as flaws from my experience. First, I wish  I were to take photographs into the gallery so that I can capture my personal experience. Another thing is that the back room was a little messy with photographs like the poster reel at Spencer’s. I think one positive to the gallery though is that a lot of the photos there are for sale. So I guess if I’m not allowed to take pictures inside then I can physically take it home and frame it above my fireplace.

I learned a lot about how pure black and white photography can be. It brings it down to its bare essentials to make the content more imperative and significant.  I had a lot of respect for Dobrowner as an artist not only because of his tremendous photography skill, but also the fact that he risked his life to get all those breath taking storm photos!!

I was able to find his photo online:

 

mask in a mask

Posted: December 2, 2010 in Uncategorized